20-25 May 2022
DISTRIBUTECH 2022

Sessions

All Sessions
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  • All Tracks
  • Knowledge Hub
  • Conference
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Knowledge Hub
COVID 19 and Winter Storm Uri: Lessons Learned in Residential Energy Resilience in the Age of Home Electrification
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query_builder 1:30pm - 2:00pm
place 101, Exhibit Floor
card_travel Presentation
mic English
COVID 19 and Winter Storm Uri: Lessons Learned in Residential Energy Resilience in the Age of Home Electrification
Pecan Street collects circuit-level electricity use data at more than a thousand homes in four states at one-second intervals, providing insight into how the pandemic changed the way people use energy at home. In this session we will discuss: The significant shifts in residential energy consumption were observed during the COVID 19 pandemic. Home energy performance during the harsh weather and grid outages of winter storm Uri. The impending full electrification of homes in the form of heat pumps for space and water heating, electric vehicles, electric cooktops, and their impact on shifting consumption baselines and system shocks.
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Conference
Utility Aggregation of Energy Efficiency from Residential Customers under FERC 2222
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query_builder 1:30pm - 2:00pm
place C144, First Level
card_travel Presentation
mic English
Utility Aggregation of Energy Efficiency from Residential Customers under FERC 2222
FERC 2222 does many things and most people are focused on the aggregation of solar, wind, storage, biomass & gas, and demand-side management. Few have realized that there is another component in FERC 2222, energy efficiency. While most utilities have energy efficiency programs, none are ready to do what FERC 2222 is allowing – enrolling a premise in an energy efficiency program and bidding the enrollees into the wholesale market for a few decades. A number of questions emerge, how does a utility determine what counts and for how many KW, does it differ by season, does the energy efficiency need to be verified from time to time? This presentation will provide an unbiased discussion of FERC 2222 and energy efficiency, the requirements, open questions, and the advantages of a utility being the aggregator of the program. It will also examine how the energy efficiency programs of a utility fit in with the FERC 2222 requirements.
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Conference
Bidirectional EV Charging - Providing a Resource for the Grid and the Consumer
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query_builder 1:30pm - 2:30pm
place C149, First Level
card_travel Panel
mic English
Bidirectional EV Charging - Providing a Resource for the Grid and the Consumer
Utilities are piloting it, car manufacturers feature it, start-ups have developed the software and hardware to do manage it, regulators are making rules for it, and customers experiencing more weather-related outages are asking for it. Will EVs soon be providing ancillary services to the grid, providing additional value for owners? Will homes and small businesses ride through outages by leveraging the batteries in their vehicles? If so, when? What is the current status at leading utilities, manufacturers, regulators, and vendors? Join us for a lively panel discussion with EV manufacturers and utilities to discuss the future of EVs as a grid resource. 
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Knowledge Hub
Decarbonization Through Energy Savings and Peak Demand Reduction at the Grid Edge
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query_builder 1:30pm - 2:00pm
place 1509, Exhibit Floor
card_travel Presentation
mic English
Decarbonization Through Energy Savings and Peak Demand Reduction at the Grid Edge
Volt/VAr Optimization (VVO) is a powerful tool to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.  Global climate change presents challenges to American prosperity and security and the United States of America must act urgently to reduce its carbon pollution to address the climate crisis.  At 15% of global emissions [1] (In 2019, U.S. greenhouse gas emissions totaled 6,558 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalents, or 5,769 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalents after accounting for sequestration from the land sector)), The USA is the second-largest source of GHGs, and the U.S. electric power sector[2] accounts for 25% of national GHG emissions and approximately 62.5% of U.S. electricity comes from burning fossil fuels, mostly coal (60% of CO2 emission) and natural gas (38% of CO2 emission).  Cost-effective innovations to reduce power sector GHGs are critical, especially as the electrification of our economy continues.  VVO can substantially reduce GHG emissions from the grid (1,640 million metric tonnes in 2019) by enhancing end-use efficiency by up to 4% and by increasing hosting capacity for clean distributed energy resources by as much as 2X[3].  Furthermore, these sizeable benefits become further amplified as economies around the world increasingly turn to electricity to power transportation, industry, and buildings.  VVO can yield end-use efficiency through a mechanism called Conservation Voltage Reduction (CVR). 
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Conference
Achieving the Promise of Grid Security with OpenFMB and Cybersecurity Zero-trust Best Practices
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query_builder 1:30pm - 2:00pm
place C143, First Level
card_travel Presentation
mic English
Achieving the Promise of Grid Security with OpenFMB and Cybersecurity Zero-trust Best Practices
Today’s best in class cybersecurity practices for Industrial Control Systems promote defense-in-depth techniques with firewalls and network segmentation. Enhancements are being made to detect intrusions through network monitoring. However, today’s systems still awkwardly fail to implement zero-trust models. Zero trust means that no entity or device is trusted by default from inside or outside the network, and verification is required to gain access to resources on the network. By implementing zero-trust, systems can be nearly impervious to attacks. Asset Owners are weary of elaborate cybersecurity requirements with no best practice designs or implementations, and dismayed by proprietary architectures. Asset Owners are rapidly adopting Cloud services and pushing their operations to the edge of the Grid. This increases risk and urgency to identify and adopt enhanced security practices. OpenFMB coupled with security best practices provides the foundation for securing grid devices using cryptographic identity, zero trust, distributed PKI, and situational awareness. This talk presents the findings from Duke Energy’s Emerging Technology Offices’ multi-year effort to develop a best in class security architecture for the Distribution Grid at the Mount Holly Microgrid using OpenFMB. An OpenFMB node is a field device with compute resources like an industrial PC or gateway. The OpenFMB Secure system provisions and deploys nodes, updates node applications, and automates key renewal. This novel architecture leverages Docker for application containerization, Kubernetes for container management and deployment, and SPIFFE/SPIRE with Trusted Platform Module (TPM) identity management for workload attestation to ultimately build a system that is scalable and secure from the data center to field devices. By completing this latest step, the microgrid presents a scalable architecture demonstrating interoperability, security, integrity, authentication and situational awareness.
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Knowledge Hub
Lessons Learned from Launching an Innovation Center in the Midst of a Global Pandemic and Recession
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query_builder 1:30pm - 2:00pm
place 1041, Exhibit Floor
card_travel Presentation
mic English
Lessons Learned from Launching an Innovation Center in the Midst of a Global Pandemic and Recession
Even though 2020 was not the best of times, that was when Duquesne Light launched its innovation center. This session will address the unique but complementary roles that senior leadership, front-line workers, and external innovators should play to drive innovation. Topics will include how the board of directors and senior management must set the direction for innovation; the “nuts and bolts” for managing innovation; how to measure success; and how to involve employees and measure the culture for innovation. If Duquesne Light could successfully launch an Innovation Center at the worst of times, surely our fellow utilities and innovators can learn something from that experience!
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Conference
How Con Edison Helped Reduce Subway Delays as Part of Its Smart City Initiative
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query_builder 1:30pm - 2:00pm
place C154, First Level
card_travel Presentation
mic English
How Con Edison Helped Reduce Subway Delays as Part of Its Smart City Initiative
Con Edison, deployed an innovative software solution called STORM (Support Tool for Outage Restoration Management) to help New York’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) reduce delays and improve the quality of life to New York’s 5.7 million daily subway riders. To better support New York City Transit information needs, Con Edison has installed AMI smart meters and communication infrastructure to over 2,000 of NYCT’s locations and have designed and built a system to detect and address problems before they become delay-causing outages. This presentation will review the STORM program and explain how the initiative is expanding to provide new levels of flexibility in tracking other types of sensitive customers.
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Conference
ART - Advanced Restoration Time Results
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query_builder 1:30pm - 2:00pm
place C147, First Level
card_travel Presentation
mic English
ART - Advanced Restoration Time Results
Today’s utility customers expect access to real-time outage information, and they make important decisions based on this information. However, utilities are often hesitant to provide customers in-depth estimated restoration times (ERT) because if those times are inaccurate, customers may be more frustrated than if the utility had not communicated at all. Utility providers can improve customer experience by implementing an advanced restoration time approach that compartmentalizes restoration times into a four-stage process: estimated, projected, verified, and actual restoration. Each stage in the process has its own set of actions and objectives to make restoration times more accurate during an outage event.  Once an outage event is associated to a device, the initial ERT is calculated based on historical restoration times for that type of device. The first step in an advanced restoration time solution is to automatically modify the initial ERT value based on real-time conditions, such as the number of existing outages and the number of eligible crews.  The second step is when the outage is assigned to a crew where the system combines travel time with the modified initial ERT to create a projected restoration time (PRT). The accuracy is further improved when a first responder arrives at the protection device and assesses the downstream damage.  This third step is known as a verified restoration time.  After the outage has been repaired, the last step in the advanced restoration time process is to document the outcome which is known as the actual restoration time. This final time can then be used as the new historical information, thus creating a self- learning cycle of data to improve accuracy. Advanced restoration time solutions and models have the potential to change how the industry defines requirements for meeting levels of response and performance. By using an advanced restoration time solution, utility providers can deliver their customers more accurate information and create a new customer outage experience that delivers timely information across multiple modes of communication.
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Conference
How Utilities Can Increase DERMS Deployment and ROI with Real-time Operational Sensing
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query_builder 1:30pm - 2:00pm
place C141, First Level
card_travel Presentation
mic English
How Utilities Can Increase DERMS Deployment and ROI with Real-time Operational Sensing
DERMS technology is essential to managing the increasing quantity and variety of DER on the grid. But the integration of these new tools and assets is still in its infancy, with no manual to guide the most cost-effective way to transition to the grid of the future. Expectations around optimal use of DERMS have largely focused on energy trading and less on harnessing value on the operations side. However, DERMS technology is underutilized compared with its potential. Advances in sensor technology combined with a DERMS platform offer new business models to optimize operations and derive additional value. For example, the DERMS model may show that a utility has 50 GW of capacity when data from a real-time operational sensor shows a capacity of 75 GW. To explore this potential, Enbala and PSEG-Long Island are working with Micatu to apply real-time operational sensing with DERMS technology. This project aims to help utilities open capacity and develop business models better adapted to DER proliferation. This presentation will discuss the battery/genset program deployed at PSEG-LI and the deployment of optical sensors. The DERMS/sensor model is configured to manage both active power consumption and generation downline of a sensor on a distribution network, ensuring the operator can maintain power flows between desired operating thresholds for grid stability and reliability. Configuring the DERMS with real-time sensor data supports DER operation, alleviates hosting capacity discrepancies, and provides better awareness of the impact on power quality with increasing DER. Sensors can be directly integrated with the DERMS using DPN3 to support threshold control, providing situational awareness for dispatching assets during VPP power breaches. We will discuss lessons learned from relaying real-time data to the DERMS and technical and operational best practices for optimizing hosting capacity and increasing ROI on VPP investments.
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Conference
Predictive Maintenance of Underground Cable System
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query_builder 1:30pm - 2:00pm
place C140, First Level
card_travel Presentation
mic English
Predictive Maintenance of Underground Cable System
As the largest utility company in the state of Texas, Oncor provides power to more than 3.7 million customers. Monitoring and maintaining the assets in Oncor’s system is critical to maintaining system reliability and customer service. Among its approximately 18K miles of underground primary voltage cable, Oncor has found that cable and cable accessory failures are due to different causes such as insulation issues, age, manufacturing process, workmanship, corrosion, etc. To realize the maximum life of these assets, in addition to good design, robust processes are needed to ensure that new cables are installed defect free and maintenance activities for in-service cables are efficiently prioritized. In this presentation, Oncor will show how the application of big data analytical methods, coupled with predictive modeling tools and in-depth root cause analysis of failures, can be used to predict cable outages, optimize prioritization of maintenance activities and asses system health. We use outage, asset (attributes and testing results), root cause analysis (RCA) and 15-minute interval AMS (Advanced Metering System) data to predict cable outages, optimize prioritization of maintenance activities and asses system health. Our approach has shown a 40% reduction in primary cable related SAIDI over the last few years.
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